Winter and dry skin...

Tuesday, 18 January 2022

Does your skin feel like a grape during the winter?

Here are some tips from our experts on how to treat dry skin.

The shower!

Take a shower (or bath) properly:

  • Use warm water (not too hot)

  • Stay only a few minutes (10 minutes maximum)

  • Wash gently with a mild, fragrance-free soap

  • "Pat" the body with a towel, without rubbing

Moisturize!

Apply a moisturizer regularly to the skin

  • After each shower and after drying the skin

  • Use a cream or an ointment instead of a lotion

  • Look for products with a "Ceramide" base

  • Ceramides are the main constituents of the stratum corneum and serve to retain water in the skin

  • Other ingredients to look for:

  • Lactic acid, urea, hyaluronic acid, glycerin, lanolin, petrolatum

Carry a tube of hand cream with you at all times!

Stay warm!

Avoid prolonged exposure to the cold.

If you must go outside, wear gloves or mittens and stay as warm as possible.

With these few tips, your skin should improve quickly.

However, if you still have symptoms of itching, burning or discomfort, it would be wise to consult a dermatologist.

Dermago

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